Dun Beag Broch

Dun Beag Broch, Isle of Skye

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Location

Nr Stuan

Road

A863

SatNav

Nr IV56 8FA

Brochs are massive, circular, prehistoric fortified dwellings some 2,500 years old. They have been built using a drystane construction method with walls typically 12 feet thick and an inside floor space of around 30 feet in diameter.

 

These round-houses were built and occupied from around 800BC until the second century AD. This is the earlier part of the Scottish Iron Age when defensive hill forts were being constructed in prominent and strategic positions in the landscape across the British Isles.

Of all the Brochs on Skye, this is by far the easiest to get to, as its near a main road with a car park provided, from where it is just a short walk and is signposted quite well.


The ruin has been cleared of its fallen stones and what is left is quite well preserved. You'll find is not quite a typical broch in design, as there isn't a guard cell in the entrance passage, although there is a chamber on either side as you enter the broch.


Surprisingly for a pre-historic stronghold, the broch was occupied in the 18th century. Pottery and other precious objects from the reigns of King Henry II, Edward I, James VI, George II and George III have been found at the broch.


The location is also unusual, as its on a hilltop with commanding views, rather than positioned next to the sea. Its name means 'little fort', and there are traces of a hillfort nearby known as Dun Mor, 'big fort'.